Secondary School Curriculum

  

Heritage International School curriculum has been developed according to the requirements of the Ontario Ministry of Education. 


The Definition of a Credit

A credit is granted in recognition of the successful completion (that is, completion with a final percentage mark of 50 per cent or higher) of a course that has been scheduled for a minimum of 110 hours. Credits are granted by a principal on behalf of the Minister of Education for courses that have been developed or authorized by the ministry. Half or partial credits may also be offered, and the amount of scheduled time will be assigned accordingly (e.g., 55 hours required for a half-credit course).

For the purpose of granting a credit, scheduled time is defined as the time during which students participate in planned learning activities designed to lead to the achievement of the curriculum expectations of a course. Planned learning activities include interaction between the teacher and the student and assigned individual or group work (other than homework) related to the achievement of the learning expectations in the course. Planned learning activities will be delivered through classroom or e-learning instruction and activities and/or through community placements related to work experience and cooperative education. 

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Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) Requirements

The OSSD is granted, on the recommendation of the Principal of the secondary school last attended, to a student who has successfully fulfilled the following requirements:

  

· 30 credits, including 18 compulsory credits and 12 optional credits

  

· 40 hours of community involvement

  

· Completion of the literacy requirement

Types of Courses in Grade 9 & 10

Students in Grades 9 and 10 will make the choice between academic, applied and locally developed courses primarily on the basis of their strengths, interests, and needs. 

Academic Courses

Academic courses develop students’ knowledge and skills through the study of theory and abstract problems. These courses focus on the essential concepts of a subject and explore related concepts as well. They incorporate practical applications as appropriate. 

Applied Courses

Applied courses focus on the essential concepts of a subject, and develop students’ knowledge and skills through practical applications and concrete examples. Familiar situations are used to illustrate ideas, and students are given more opportunities to experience hands-on applications of the concepts and theories they study.
 

Open Courses

Open courses are designed to prepare students for further study in a subject, and to enrich their education generally. These courses comprise a set of expectations that are appropriate for all students in a given grade. 

Types of Courses in Grade 11 & 12

Students in grades 11 and 12 will choose from among four destination-related course types: University Preparation, University/College Preparation, College Preparation, and Workplace Preparation. Open courses are also offered in Grades 11 and 12. Students will make their choices based on their interests, achievement, and career goals. 


 It is very important that students choose courses for the appropriate destination in order to ensure their interest and their success. University/College (M) and University (U) courses, for example, have a high level of difficulty and mostly theoretical content. Workplace (E) and College (C) courses will be more reasonably paced and will include practical real-life examples and applications.  

University Preparation Courses

University preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for university programs. An emphasis is placed on theoretical knowledge and supporting application in the course content as well as the development of independent research and learning skills. 

University/College Preparation Courses

University/College preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for specific programs offered at universities and colleges. These courses place emphasis on both the theoretical aspects of the course content and the practical applications. 

College Preparation Courses

College preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the requirements for entrance to most college programs or for admission to apprenticeship or other training programs. These courses focus on concrete applications of the concepts and theories that are studied and help to develop critical thinking and problem solving skills.

Workplace Preparation Courses

Workplace preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the expectations of employers, if they plan to enter the workplace directly after graduation, or the requirements for admission to certain apprenticeship or other training programs. They emphasize practical skills and stress the importance of life-long learning. 

Open Courses

 Open courses are designed to broaden students’ knowledge and skills in subjects that reflect their interests and to prepare them for active and rewarding participation in society. They are not designed with the specific requirements of universities, colleges, or the workplace in mind.